The Blog

Service coordination for individuals with developmental Disabilities

Through our services in Cape Girardeau and Scott Counties, we help individuals with developmental disabilities acquire the services and supports they need to maximize their potential and strengthen their level of independence

Nonverbal, confined to a wheelchair, unhappy—something needed to change for Steven.

Steven now raises his head, sits up straight, and smiles. He has made great progress since he moved into a group home. His case manager is thrilled, saying “I have even heard him laugh out loud!”

Steven now raises his head, sits up straight, and smiles. He has made great progress since he moved into a group home. His case manager is thrilled, saying “I have even heard him laugh out loud!”

Steven is a nonverbal adult with developmental disabilities who lived in a nursing home in Cape Girardeau for ten years. He was placed there with his mother. After his mother passed away, Steven started focusing on another lady who resembled his mother. However, her family did not like this, and the nursing home spoke to Steven’s guardian. Plans were made to transfer him to a nursing home in Sikeston. Steven has no other family.

At this time, CCSOMO’s Service Coordinator, Cindy, became involved and began visiting him in the nursing home. Steven uses a wheel chair and is incontinent. Cindy noticed there were times he had feces and urine on his legs. He always hung his head down and seldom looked up, and he would not allow anyone to touch him.

New environment makes all the difference

Cindy began work immediately to get Steven transferred to an independent, but supportive living situation. With input from Steven’s guardian, the decision was made for placement at a group home in Sikeston.

The group home houses two other residents with developmental disabilities, along with the staff support couple, and their adult daughter. The first day Steven was placed in the home, he was very agitated. He continuously rubbed his head, and tried to maneuver his wheelchair to the door to try to leave. The first night he was there he would not get in bed and stayed in his wheelchair the entire night.

However, with patience and loving care, Steven gradually became comfortable and began to enjoy his new home. At Christmas with the family, Steven opened gifts, then tore the paper into small pieces and placed them on the floor, laughing and pointing for someone to clean the mess.

Steven has thrived and is doing things he never did before. He is attending a day center. He will wear shoes. He will point to items he wants. He will place his cup on the counter and bang it for more. He will sit at the table and insists on sitting between the staff support couple. He requires a puréed diet, and because the family will puree the food they eat for him, he is eating food he has never had before! When he is full he will push himself away from the table. He is even trying to say a few words!

Cindy is thrilled by the changes in Steven. “It has been a blessing to see how well he is doing. I have even heard him laugh out loud! The family is doing wonders with him and it shows.”

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